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opens more than 200,000 jobs to women. >> ifill: then, we turn to u.s. foreign policy, as confirmation hearings begin for secretary of state nominee john kerry, two former national security advisers stephen hadley and zbigniew brzezinski weigh in. >> brown: paul solman looks at china's fast growing economy and asks, is it headed for a crash? >> wages are rising for the burgeoning middle class, but for hardscrabble factory workers: mounting protests against unlivable wages and working conditions. >> ifill: and vice president joe biden hangs out with hari sreenivasan on google plus to talk about gun violence. >> make your voices heard. this town listens when people rise up and speak. >> ifill: that's all ahead on tonight's "newshour." >> major funding for the pbs newshour has been provided by: >> and by the alfred p. sloan foundation. supporting science, technology, and improved economic performance and financial literacy in the 21st century. >> and with the ongoing support of these institutions and foundations. and... >> this program was made possible by the corporation for public broad
at the kerry nomination and foreign policy challenges he'll face, with two men who've served as national security adviser to the president. zbigniew brzezinski held that position with president carter. he's now a counselor at the center for strategic and international studies. stephen hadley served under president george w. bush. he's currently a senior adviser at the united states institute of peace. welcome to both of you. first, zbigniew brzezinski, your thoughts on john kerry as nominee for secretary of state? >> i think he's an absolutely top-notch choice. very good. experienced, solid, energetic with a broad vision and with a strong focus on trying to stabilize those parts of the world that are especially dangerous. i think he's practical, intelligent, well informed. >> brown: stephen hadley? >> he's in a way spent his whole life preparing for this job and it's good he did because he takes in the a very challenging time and i think he's going to have a lot of challenges before him. i think one of them is to prioritize where he's going to put his time. >> brown: well, you know, he s
agenda now. and in foreign policy, very often, the actions you have taken, the consequences are now clear whether good or bad. and you either have to make a corrective course for some of the bad consequences or try to solidify some of the gains that you've made. and because you really don't have four years now. it will start to slip away very quickly. you've got to set some priorities, because the president's time, the secretary of state's time, secretary of defense's time is pretty limited. you better know what you want to achieve in in in three years or so >> you told me earlier this morning something i had never known. upper the national security adviser, one of the president's closest aides during the first term. then you were nominated to be secretary of state, and you told me you had to go through a full background check. >> that's right. i remember thinking-- they were going out and talking to my neighbors again. and i remember thinking didn't we just do this four years ago? you know what i've been doing for the last four years. maybe it's a little bit of a sense of the turf wars i
of experiences. both in foreign policy and on the crime bill, the '94 crime bill is something he shepherded and his extraordinary ability to deal with senate republicans in a way a lot of people can't. senator reed and mitch mcconnell don't get along that well so i don't read nieg into it other than the president has an eset in the vice president and he's using that asset and he's deploying him well. the thing we should be mindful of is that there's over the next four years there's going to be a lot of tea leaf reading but at the end of the day, you know, the president is using the personing that get a job done and he's done an extraordinary job so far. let me say, passing this legislation will be tough. it's important to put your best feet on the ground there because it's really not -- it's going to be tough to get these bills passed. >> and it's not just ability. the vice president -- and again i worked closely with him for a few years -- he really likes this kind of political dealmaking in a way i don't think the president likes that much. if he's pushed to it he can do it. but the vice
. >> reporter: a number of presidents in their second terms have focused heavily on foreign policy and now that mr. obama has begun the job of replacing his outgoing secretaries of state and defense and the director of the cia, he'll have new faces to work with on his foreign policy team. joe johns, cnn, washington. >>> well, most people who come to washington for president obama's second inauguration are happy just to be able to witness history. >>> but some visitors want a little bit more, like monogrammed pillow cases and a 24-hour butler. who wouldn't want that? you can get it all for a price. we'll tell you about it when we come back. d. earn 1% cash back everywhere, every time. [ both ] 2% back on groceries. [ all ] 3% on gas. no hoops to jump through. i earn more cash back on the things i buy the most. [ woman ] it's as easy as... one! -two. -[ all ] three! [ male announcer ] the bankamericard cash rewards credit card. apply online or at a bank of america near you. are you flo? yes. is this the thing you gave my husband? well, yeah, yes. the "name your price" tool. you tell
on foreign policy and and domestic issues. the obama doctrine calls for ending america's wars, avoiding future ones and nationbuilding here at home. good ideas all. but, mishandled, they could signal a retreat from washington's global leadership. the president is facing a $16, $17 trillion debt. he is facing a pullout from afghanistan and our role in the world. guest: it is interesting. leadership, what does that mean. if you go back on the eve of the world war, the number of foreign military installations the united states had, compare that with today. it was well under 100. the cold war has had an enormous transforming impact. dwight eisenhower cited all of this in his famous farewell address. i think there is a legitimate debate to be had over what is -- that is as old as the republic. washington's generation believed united states would be an asylum for the world's oppressed. it was a place to which victims could come and enjoy the fruits of liberty. there was no sense that we were going to impose our vision or values on the rest of the world. host: this question, in case you missed
will say about foreign policy. we are at a point this and i am worried personally about the next four years but i am curious how much, both that he ended the war in iraq and the war is receding or does he say american is signals something other than thorough retreat from the world which is how it looks. >>bret: we have the address tomorrow, but the state of the union in a couple of weeks away, what is the biggest challenge? >> we are in a real threat to our security at home and overseas but we are in a fiscal crisis. we are at odds, we have a president and a republican party not speaking to each other, we are headed, again, to the edge of the default. we have to come up with a solution to that. americans are weary of the aspirational calls for unity they hear from president at state of the union addresses and inaugural addresses but everyone is paying holiday bills worried their taxes could go up. they know that congress is broken. they know the congress is paralyzed. they know president obama was complicity in that. the republicans made a plan do go after him, but he is complicity that the
the neoconservative phase of the republican party as far as foreign policy goes. most republicans in the senate and the house, like the american people, are exhausted by 10, 11, 12 years of war. obviously, john mccain and lindsey graham are on the forefront and have shaped republican foreign policy for a few years. certainly john mccain has. he is in a shrinking minority. and it's shrinking very quickly. and i suspect you're going to see a return to the realism of colin powell of dr. brzezinski, of brent scowcroft, of george h.w. bush, of the republicans who helped us and democrats who helped us through that approach when the cold war. >> and this is the post-superpower era, where there has to be some pulling back, and david said it exactly right. >> i wouldn't say post-superpower. you're right, it's a new era. it's much more indirection in our application of power. the neocons are for direct use of power. this will have to be more indirect. >> and there may be surprises there, as always is the case. look at what happened with algeria and mali. >> dr. zbigniew brzezinski, dad, thanks for not wa
the speech, however, briep, was the absence of foreign policy. and the two really contentious appointments, or at least one is chuck hagel who is going to run the defense department. and the middle east is aflame again and now we're seeing it spread into africa in a way that is very hard to get a fix for what the model is dealing with it. these are failed states. we have tribalism again prevailing in africa and again in the middle east because islamic rage has not been distinguished. command and control of al qaeda they believe has been broken down, but as you saw in algeria in the past several days, this is going to be a continuing problem out there. that will go to the defense department, how it's run, how much money they have to spend, how they reorganized the response of that and secretary kerry would is going to pick up the baton from hillary clinton has to decide what's our relationship with egypt? how run by a muslim brotherhood. >> it's worth remarking on that because four years ago, as we all sat here, none of us expected every assumption you would make about the middle east for d
was in many ways provided the intellectual framework particularly for a lot of bush foreign policy. vice president biden used the senate and the relationships there and his practical skills has been invaluable in terms of promoting the agenda. >> now we have the marine band about to introduce the vice president of the united states. >> announcer: ladies and gentlemen, the vice president of the united states, joseph r. biden, accompanied by inaugural coordinator for the joint congressional committee on ceremonies, kelly fado. senate department sergeant at arms, martina bradford. house saght at arms carry handley. harry reed and nancy pelosi. >> i said that was the marine band. it was the u.s. army herald trumpets. >> have to get that right. >> what were you saying mark? joe, joe, joe? >> i think this concerns what we were talking about. >> our first glimpse of the president as he walks through the hall, accompanied as you can see behind by chuck schumer head of the joint committee and next to him, lamar alexander of the bipartisanship on display and behind him the leadership of the house
have a different engagement with the world. that both changes foreign policy but it also potentially frees up resources in domestic policy. >> he can use that as a springboard to say now that we have the opportunity, we must seize the moment. he's got this whole -- his wife now is getting very involved in the politics of this. she's going to be very involved in this. wow, look at that picture. whoa. >> i think we should acknowledge this is the anniversary of martin luther king day. he took that moment to pause before the statue in -- >> he wrapped himself in it the cloak of martin luther king today. >> something he hasn't always done in office -- >> very, very purposeful -- >> yes, i think that was sort of -- and you can see the concecon -- that martin luther king was so courageous, that i'm going to really state what i believe, here and now. >> i think it was martin luther king revisited. >> well, i'm not so sure i'd go that far. >> i know they don't. the white house, they don't. >> but i do believe that he -- the moment called for sort of laying out what you stand for. paying homag
that was a signal to the iranians, listen, if you come halfway with me, we can cut a deal. that's the foreign policy stuff and a lot of people, netanyahu is going to win that election tomorrow i bet they're looking hard at that tonight. >> greta: the thing i pick out and always the thing i pick out and sampled, is that he talks about helping the streets of detroit, and economically. and i thought to myself, well, you know, poverty in this country has grown over the last decade, including, including in his administration, is that the people in this country, the poor people still are left behind and we sort of always pay sort of political lip service and say how much we want to help them. as the improverished class grows, we aren't helped them and given them opportunity to help themselves. >> i was talking to dennis kucinich in the green room. what happened to detroit, it was a forge and furnace of world war ii, 2 million people there, it was freedom's forge or arthur herman's new book, my wife grew up there. and now it's 750, 800,000 people. and thinking of tearing down buildings and turning it into
're also entering into a new age of some beg decision in foreign policy because this country right now is starting to get some adversaries around the world because of our drone policy. that was not the situation four years ago. so this is -- our foreign policy is going to be judged on just how aggressive we get with that, and there's a growing concern in the community across the country about the drone attacks. just how many innocent people are we killing? there's been concerted conversation about we have to reel this in, and president obama, i think, is going to hear a great deal about that when it comes to foreign policy coming up here in the coming months. just how aggressive are we going to get? >> that specific reference that we should not be in a state of perpetual war. >> we are, and it's a different kind of war. >> i mean, that's the -- legally that's the justification that they cite for saying why it is that we can kill people in places where we're technically not waging some sort of war. that there is a global war still underway, and the authorization of using military force
justice. dr. king was a fierce critic of foreign policy in the vietnam war. in his beyond vietnam speech, which he delivered at the york's riverside church, 1967, a year before the day he was assassinated, dr. king calledll the united states the greatest purveyor of violence in the world today. "time" magazine called the speech demagogic slander that sounded like a script for radio hanoi. today, we let you decide. we play an excerpt of dr. king's speech, beyond vietnam. >> after 1954, they watched us conspire to prevent elections which could have surely brought ho chi minh to power over the united vietnam and they realized they had been did -- betrayed again. when we asked why they do not leap to negotiate, these things must be remembered. also it must be clear that the leaders of hanoi considered the presence of american troops in support of the diem regime to have been the initial military breach of the geneva agreements concerning foreign troops. and they remind us that they did not begin to send troops in large numbers and even supplies, and to the south, until american forces had mo
all americans are prepared for a 21st century work force. talk to us about foreign policy, democracy in the middle east. i think we want to hear it all. >> so your message, he wants us to say, hey. you're naive. >> yes. >> that was a naive speech. >> yes. >> i agree. >> i don't think he cares what we say. >> that's right. >> but i think he cares what others think and i think he needs to be able to project that message of hope to voters without them tuning out and saying, yeah. yada, yada. i've heard that. don't remind me. >> pragmatic. >> in fact we could take the hope stickers from the last election and just add pragmatic on to that. >> pragmatic hope. >> i think that would be it. >> all right. stick around. i want to talk a little about what the democratic party is up to and what obama for america or whatever we are supposed to call it now organizing for action. trivia we asked how many times has the winning super bowl team hailed from the same state as the president during his inauguration year? all right. the answer is three. i only got two. here is missed, nixon was inaugurated
if there is a legacy on foreign policy other than the important moment of taking on -- >> it lets us take note in a way of the way the first family has lived their life in the white house, one thing that you noted is that the obamas like to go out to restaurants and eat out as opposed to the bushes who entertained inside the white house. how does that change the washington scene, do you think? >> i think there's almost been less of that, too. as time went on, there was a newness when they moved into their new city and their new community and they wanted to get out and about and be seen as members of our community family here in washington. but the reality is, it does get very hard to make the movements outside of the white house to disrupt the flow of traffic. although, it is an exciting moment, you know, from time to time when they are able to do that. so, i think, you know, the way you live your life before you came here is the way you try to live your life when you are here. >> you worked very closely with laura bush. >> i did. >> i'm just curious, this is the president's day and the vice president'
the president views this -- he is really -- he sees himself as the protector in chief and that's true on foreign policy and it's true on domestic -- >> he clearly seems to have been personally affected, matthew dowd, by the newtown tragedy, but how much -- if you were advising him, how much should he invest in this at the beginning of what is a packed second term? >> he definitely was affected by it. every american was affected by what happened in that awful situation. i mean the president could have done a lot of this in the last four years which he chose not to do. he could have done a bunch on executive orders and decisions he chose not to because he understood the political problem with this. to me this whole issue -- i live in austin, texas, and texas is a place where people love their guns. i have five -- owned five guns. most people know something has to be done. most people know there has to be something done. how far does it is extended is a question of debate. something will get passed -- but i'm just -- >> before that, my fear is the real thing that won't get done is what the real iss
of how progressive this message was is the foreign policy piece. advocating for engagement against the backdrop of a hostage situation in algeria is a very firm flag to plant in the ground. to say that as we see al qaeda cells multiplying, taking over a host of failed states in north africa and now west africa. to say these are not our enemies, that we can come in peace, that we can have peaceable relations with evil actors in the world is very much obama 1.0. for him to say that now i thought was really, really remarkable if you're talking about hawk versus dove, progressive versus conservative. >> i thought that was a direct message to the mullahs and to the people of iran. i spent some time with one family this week. i think he knows that the worst case scenario is war, it always is the worst case scenario and he's hoping somehow we can stop them from weaponizing. >> but chris -- >> nuclear weapons. >> i think this was a forthrightly liberal speech. i think that -- >> you're an eight. >> he said we are a country that doesn't -- that believes that every citizen deserves a decent
years and you saw he lost some foreign policy issuei. if the first year, he was dominant. and he was not as big a force in the republican party because people knew he was not going to be on the electoral battlefield. >> i think that's right, john. from his point of view, what he also -- he has to worry not only about whether hillary clinton's going to get in, not only about his own age and health, he has to worry about the overall success of this partnership. he has a very strong self-interest in seeing barack obama succeed. as you well know, after eight years of one party being in office, it's not easy to hold on to that office. and one of the things that helped to elect george h.w. bush at the end of reagan was reagan went out on a high. he had some trouble in the second term but he went out on a high. and that really helped bush. i think that's important for biden that president obama succeed. >> i just missed this one but the last vice president before george h.w. bush was martin van buren. >> biden has constantly been in and out of the dog house for say things he wasn't supp
administration's foreign policy. >> secretary clinton introducing senator john kerry at the confirmation hearing. we'll have the latest on what she said and what senator -- they have in common and not in a good way. we'll talk about what's next for secretary clinton as well as senator kerry and be sure to check out the "news nation tumblr page. at optionsxpress we're all about options trading. we create easy to use, powerful trading tools for all. look at these streaming charts! they're totally customizable and they let you visualize what might happen next. that's genius! strategies, chains, positions. we put 'em all on one screen! could we make placing a trade any easier? mmmm...could we? open an account today and get a free 13-month e ibd™ subscription when you call 1-888-280-0157 now. optionsxpress by charles schwab. marie callender's turkey breast with stuffing is a great reason to slow down. creamy mash potatoes, homestyle gravy and 320 calories. marie callender's. it's time to savor. and 320 calories. with tasty grilled flavor and goodness to savor ♪ ♪ friskies grillers blend. ♪ fe
republican friends to be fair. i used to put republicans because i would trust them or on foreign policy. i think anybody who is fair and would look at the president's record -- he has done a wonderful job of advancing our interests as well as protecting us. once again, thank you 4 c- span.org so much. i am enjoying the coverage. host: naomi tweets in -- the metro stations here are very crowded. as we mentioned, metro is planning a rush hour schedule, which means a train every five- six minutes at every station throughout the day because of the large crowds. about 800,000 is the current estimate, to attend the inauguration wendy is on american calling in from sydney, australia. good afternoon, good evening, good morning to you. caller: it is good evening here. host: are you watching online? caller: i am watching on tv, on cable. i spent a good portion of my adult life here, but i am constantly reading -- reading the news about the state. i still consider myself a think sometimes my perspective gives me a broader vision. i can see the discord, the downside of what has been happening, but i c
him look bad on foreign policy, he's going to hold out as long as he can and say, look, everybody behave themselves and play nice with me and at the end maybe i'll let you have the big list. >> megyn: and he'll try to withstand the pressure to make an endorsement as long as possible. i don't know, i think it's tougher when one of the people is the man you selected as your vice-president. yes, she's secretary of state, but vice-president, air telling the world, he could be president. i'm telling you, feel comfortable with the thought of him being president, god forbid anything happens to me and tougher to turn around and say, actually i liked her better. (laughter) >> he'll have to hope that joe biden will hold off longer. >> megyn: we'll find out. thanks, chris. >> you bet. >> megyn: we're learning more today about a new pentagon plan that lifts the ban on women in combat. wow, this turned out to be controversial. getting a lot of strong reaction to this and up next, we'll have some new concerns with the debate. and arrest and murder from the city of brotherly love, the frighteni
with president george w. bush and foreign policy will be happening in the second term. >> the first thing that strikes me on a day like today is what a wonderful celebration this is with our democracy. the peaceful transfer of power. of course president obama is being affirmed again, but we look at our institutions. you see the supreme court justice swear in the president. it's a wonderful thing and it's something that when you've traveled around the world, not every country can take this moment for granted. when the will of the people is confirmed and affirmed the way we're going to see today. >> the president is speaking to the world, he's speaking to the united states, he's speaking to the people in washington and he's speaking to republicans. what does he need to say to republicans? >> on inaugural day, it is really the high point for any presidency, i think, because after that we start to get back to our regular criticism, and we did this wrong and that wrong, and so i would hope the president would use the opportunity to say i've won the election, but this
the country the stakes could not be higher. the debt, deficit, entitlement reform. immigration, foreign policy problems tend to be incredibly important in second terms as presidents realize, while they become lame ducks that advancing domestic agenda legislation is very difficult. we'll see the president likely travel more and deal with much of his international legacy. trying to wrap up his second term as best he can with so much unfinished foreign policy business he inhurted from bush administration. buckle up, jeff. not with standing the poet's kind words and the president's lofty rhetoric, washington tomorrow goes back into the being the political crawl city it has been in past years and likely to escalate more so. happy day, shep. shepard: happy day. at least we have today and men and women from both political parties, from the far right, far left and all of those in the middle, they're about to sit down for some individual tils. happy they are all are, dvittles. secretary lew and the rest for new cabinet sick tears all with fights ahead. we seen former presidents interacting with paul ry
and cody keenan. ben rhodes usually takes the foreign policy side of things. jon favreau, he's usually most involved in this big vision. >> >> jennifer: he's like 31 years old. >> cody keenan also young. he always plays a hand in this. my guess would be -- i haven't spoken to favreau about this. he would be working on this closely with president obama. they do the speeches up until the last minute. on the nobel prize acceptance speech, obama came down from his hotel room with a copy of the speech, went to the fourth floor and gave changes to make on the way over to receive the speech. that could be going on right now. >> john: these guys write the speeches in terms of overview. they're there for structure and tone but it is the president himself who decides what the final content is going to be and who makes the revisions he needs to. how deep his editorial involvement is. >> jennifer: if you're going to be true to who you are, as president, you have to -- you have to have input on this. the language has to come from you, naturally. he's a good writer. obviously he's got significant opinion
to foreign policy. but the biggest thing is that 1600 pennsylvania avenue is kind of a dangerous neighborhood. if you hang around there long enough, the odds start going against you. often the second term has been very tough for presidents. we'll see if this one can avoid that precedent. >> never heard it described that way. dangerous neighborhood. dangerous territory. >> yes. >> ron brownstein, nice to see you this morning. thank you very much. >>> next hour, what are we missing? is there an issue that no one is talking about now that will define the president's second term? we'll explore the possibilities. victor? >> all right. some of the drama at this year's sundance film festival is political. we'll talk with the stars of a couple documentaries that come straight out of the history books. >>> first i want to take you to a beautiful place, the foothills of the sierra nevada mountains. artists are working with doctors and scientists to create some mi mind-blowing products. gary tuchman has more in this week's start small, think big. >> reporter: these skilled glassblowers are creating anat
. then he becomes a lame duck and then you have to start shifting more and more toward foreign policy, traveling around the world. on the domestic agend ahe has a very short time before he becomes a lame duck. >> the president's inaugural address tomorrow is a tradition that dates back to george washington in 1789. the president plans to look ahead more than back in the speech. let's get some insight from the wall street journal columnist. what are your thoughts on what the president needs to say in order to be most effective, to best set himself up, going into the next four years? >> reporter: well, i don't know. we will find out what he and his aides have decided about that, just about 24 hours from now. i think a second inaugural address is always a little bit difficult, you know? a first inaugural, everybody's new and excited and it's like superman coming out of the telephone booth and showing you the big "s" on his chest. a second inaugural is like, hi, it's me again. so you want to -- you want to try to make it fresh and new anyway. and i think this president has a real opportun
. >> played guitar. >> bill: on all of the foreign policies joe cirincione will be along. lynn sweet from the "chicago sun-times" and jeff kelley, center from american progress on prospects for comprehensive immigration reform this year. and hillary clinton rules the day yesterday in the united states congress. but first... >> this is the "full court press." >> on this thursday, other headlines making news, in sports, a historic upset on the college hardwood last night. number one-ranked duke considered by that ranking as the best basketball team in the country, lost to the unranked university of miami and not by a close margin. 90-63. first time the hurricanes beat a number one team. they're now 14-3. >> i went to bed before the game was over last night. i was watching some of the highlights this morning. it was amazing. they never -- it was never close. they were blowing them away from the very beginning. >> bill: duke of all schools. >> big surprise. beyonce has remained silent thus far on her lip-syncing national anthem performance at the inauguration, other singers have weighed in in
it a foreign policy of hope and change. a change, and you let it happen and you hope it works out. you hope the secularists, when in actuality we know who's filled that vacuum it's been al-qaeda, and from libya and syria trying to take down the regime in egypt. in algeria, mali, across the board they're on the roll and this administration refuses to acknowledge it it. >> brian: what's interesting, whether you agree with president bush or not, he had a freedom agenda, would put advisors on the ground or domestic forces and go in there in quick strike operations. what is this president's mission, is it all about drones with hell-fire missiles? >> it seems like, afghanistan we're headed for the exits even sooner than he talked about on the campaign trail. he's got the quote, flexibility for the second term. i think he believes that with drone strikes and special operators he can affect things enough and anybody who's been on the ground knows it's intelligence on the ground, relationships, even if it's not a massive war front bilike iraq or afghanistan, it's events on the ground that affect not
of foreign policy, andy. good to have you here. good to see you. on the subject of foreign policy the president said the following in part: we are heirs to those who want peace and not just the war who turn sworn enemies into the surest of friends-- >> i've lost the audio. >> megyn: unfortunately we've lost the audio, you can hear anddy say. we'll try to get those reestablished and these are the dangers of live tv and these are the official vases. >> inaugural gifts. >> megyn: the one that was presented to the vice-president joe biden has a more springtime etching on the side of it and we'll take a brief listen and eric cantor and the president and first lady standing up. [applause] [applause] >> the toasts are coming up right after this. and this is in by the way, statuary hall. this used to be long, long ago, the hold house chamber, now it is the area in front of where the house of representatives is. there's a statue of nearly every state in statuary hall and the halls around that area, as we see the president and vice-president receiving those gifts. >> megyn: it wasn't the b
. in that it was almost entirely about foreign policy. we would go anywhere, bear any price, pay any price, bear any burden to ensure the survival of liberty. this time, the president's foreign policy really was disspilled into seven words, a decade of war is now ending, the contrast of the last half century is striking. >> and jonathan karl who covers the white house for us, jon, i know you're in the capitol steps, the president saying we can't succumb to the fiction that all society's ills can be cured through government alone yet the bulk of the speech really praised and support and encouragement for all the things we do together through our government. >> george, i felt during much of that speech like i was listening to a democratic ronald reagan where reagan was unapologetically conservative. this was unapologetically progressive saying we must act collectively. and this was also bound with optimism saying america's possibilities are limitless. this was an effort, i believe, at that kind of optimistic progressivism whereas a reagan was your optimistic conservatism. also, i was very struck by on
Search Results 0 to 49 of about 63 (some duplicates have been removed)

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